Kanna Info

Everything about Kanna Sceletium Tortuosum

Psychoactive Properties of Kanna

Posted by on Jan 13, 2014 | 0 comments

Psychoactive Properties of Kanna

Genus Sceletium Journal of Ethnopharmacology 50 (1996) 119-130 Psychoactive constituents of the genus Sceletium Received 13 July 1995; accepted 27 November 1995 ABSTRACT The use by the Khoisan of South Africa of Sceletium plants in psychoactive preparations has often been alluded to in the literature. However, much of it is fragmentary and contradictory. The current review reassembles the historical data recorded over a 300-year period, describes techniques for the preparation and use of ‘kougoed’ from plants of Sceletium and documents the subjective experiences of a number of...

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Tribal Remedy Plundered

Posted by on Jan 13, 2014 | 0 comments

L1news Daily Express,Micro Edition 12 November 2000 Tribal remedy plundered FROM JANE FLANAGAN IN BONGOLETHU, SOUTH AFRICA ONE of Africa’s oldest tribes who discovered “Nature’s Prozac” thousands of years ago is set to lose out on a multi-million pound deal to market the remedy worldwide. Sceletium, a rare creeper which grows only in the Cape region of South Africa and is known locally as Kanna, has been used by the Khoisan tribe since prehistoric times. Scientists have spent years unlocking the plant’s secrets. The patent rights to develop it as a natural...

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Kanna and Meditation

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 0 comments

Kanna and Meditation

In the American Journal of Psychotherapy, D. Goleman (6) suggested a division of meditation into two general catagories. His distinction was supported by transpersonal psychotherapy theory papers written by Seymour Boorstein M.D (7), Greg Bogart M.A (8), Mark C. Kasprow M.D and Bruce W. Scotton M.D (9). The two categories can be called concentration meditation and receptive or insight meditation. Concentrative styles include fixing the mind or focusing upon a mandala or candle, or breath, koan, chakra, circulation of prana/chi/light, to create the restriction of attention to one point. This...

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Empathogenic Effects of Kanna

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 0 comments

The family Mesembryanthemaceae contains many pharmacologically active species. One of the most utilized by native peoples in South Africa was the genus Sceletium, for which whole tribes would travel hundreds of miles to pick a years supply. The plants of the Sceletium genus were utilized as an intoxicant; however much of the information available has been spotty and contradictory. In an effort to clarify the role and usage of Sceletium in it’s historical context a search was done on Medline which yielded the following information, derived from a report in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology...

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Kanna Effects

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 2 comments

cRocodile on Sceletium tortuosum: While I have never tasted pure (?) mesembrine I have done quite a bit of experimentation with traditionally prepared Sceletium tortuosum powder from South Africa and documented Kanna’s effects. 1. I have strong reason to believe that not all commercially available Sceletium tortuosum (seed or herb) is really that… it seems that other Mesembryamanthaceae are being passed off as S.tortuosum or S.expansum. 2. I consider Channa/Kaugoed to be a highly interesting material with strong analgesic properties. The subjective effects vary greatly with the...

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Kanna Cultivation: Growing Kanna

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 2 comments

Kanna Cultivation: Growing Kanna

SCELETIUM is a small genus of low growing succulent shrubs in the ice plant family (Aizoaceae) endemic to the karroid areas of Western, Eastern and Northern Cape Provinces, South Africa. The succulent leaves grow in pairs and eventually die away leaving persistent leaf vein skeletons clothing the lower stems, which protect the plants from adverse environmental conditions. The small flowers vary in color from white to yellow and occasionally pale orange or pink. Most of the species are practically unknown in cultivation and endangered in habitat. Plant gatherers in South Africa have observed...

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