Featured Kanna

Featured articles on Kanna ( Sceletium tortuosum )

Psychoactive Properties of Kanna

Posted by on Jan 13, 2014 | 0 comments

Psychoactive Properties of Kanna

Genus Sceletium Journal of Ethnopharmacology 50 (1996) 119-130 Psychoactive constituents of the genus Sceletium Received 13 July 1995; accepted 27 November 1995 ABSTRACT The use by the Khoisan of South Africa of Sceletium plants in psychoactive preparations has often been alluded to in the literature. However, much of it is fragmentary and contradictory. The current review reassembles the historical data recorded over a 300-year period, describes techniques for the preparation and use of ‘kougoed’ from plants of Sceletium and documents the subjective experiences of a number of...

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Kanna and Meditation

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 0 comments

Kanna and Meditation

In the American Journal of Psychotherapy, D. Goleman (6) suggested a division of meditation into two general catagories. His distinction was supported by transpersonal psychotherapy theory papers written by Seymour Boorstein M.D (7), Greg Bogart M.A (8), Mark C. Kasprow M.D and Bruce W. Scotton M.D (9). The two categories can be called concentration meditation and receptive or insight meditation. Concentrative styles include fixing the mind or focusing upon a mandala or candle, or breath, koan, chakra, circulation of prana/chi/light, to create the restriction of attention to one point. This...

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Kanna Cultivation: Growing Kanna

Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 | 2 comments

Kanna Cultivation: Growing Kanna

SCELETIUM is a small genus of low growing succulent shrubs in the ice plant family (Aizoaceae) endemic to the karroid areas of Western, Eastern and Northern Cape Provinces, South Africa. The succulent leaves grow in pairs and eventually die away leaving persistent leaf vein skeletons clothing the lower stems, which protect the plants from adverse environmental conditions. The small flowers vary in color from white to yellow and occasionally pale orange or pink. Most of the species are practically unknown in cultivation and endangered in habitat. Plant gatherers in South Africa have observed...

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